“The women we liberated were in a state almost impossible to describe. . . .[T]heir faces had a confused, vacant look. Some were beyond speaking to, ran up and down and moaned the same sentences over and over again.

“Having seen the consequences of these bestial atrocities, we were terribly agitated and determined to fight. We knew the war was past winning; but it was our obligation and sacred duty to fight to the last bullet.”[7]


 No girl or nun one was exempt from being raped. One woman came to her priest and lamented, “Father, I can’t go on living! Thirty of them raped me last night.”[8]

One priest declared,

“The girls, women and nuns were raped incessantly for hours on end, the soldiers standing in queues, the officers at the head of the queues, in front of their victims.

“During the first night many of the nuns and women were raped as many as fifty times. Some of the nuns who resisted with all their strength were shot, others were ill-treated in a dreadful manner until they were too exhausted to offer any resistance.

“The Russians knocked them down, kicked them, beat them on the head and in the face with the butt-end of their revolvers and rifles, until they finally collapsed and in this unconscious condition became the helpless victims of brutish passion, which was so inhuman as to be inconceivable.





“The same dreadful scenes were enacted in the hospitals, homes for the aged, and other such institutions. Even nuns who were seventy and eighty years old and were ill and bedridden were raped and ill-treated by these barbarians.”[9]

In a diary of a Catholic priest from Klosterbrueck, we read:

January 21st, 1945. . . . Strange to say, the population intends to remain here, and is not afraid of the Russians.

“The reports that in one village they raped all the women and abducted all the men and took them away to work somewhere must surely have been exaggerated. How dreadful it would be if Goebbels was telling the truth after all!…

“January 25th. All night long Russians entered the chapel and searched and questioned us. They ordered the woman to go outside with her small child. . .

“[They] raped the woman and sent her back to us. She came back to the chapel, her small child in her arms, the tears streaming down her face. . . .

“During the morning three women from the village came to the chapel. The vicar hardly recognized them, for their faces were distorted with fear and terror. They told us that whole families had been shot by the Russians. . . .

“Girls who had refused to allow themselves to be raped, and parents who had sought to protect their  children, had been shot on the spot. . . .

January 27th.We priests were allowed out of the chapel for half an hour today in order to bury Margarethe in the yard. Poor girl, it is a good thing you were dead and so did not know what the Russians did to your body!

January 28th. The night was very troubled again. . . .Many of the nuns are getting very distressed and nervous. They sleep even less than we do. I often hear them say, ‘If only we had fled before the Russians arrived!’”[10]

One individual who actually spoke with the soldiers later wrote,

“In every village and town they entered, the German troops came upon scenes of horror: slain boys, People’s Army men drenched with gasoline and burned—and sometimes survivors to tell the tale of the outrages.

“In some villages, they surprised Russians warm in the beds of women they had taken, and found the bodies of the many French war prisoners who had died defending German women and children.

“Staggered by what he had seen and heard, a German officer tried desperately to make sense of the disaster; to understand the minds of men ‘who find . . . pleasure in raping the same woman over and over, dozens of times, even while other women are standing near.’”[11]

Goodrich notes,

“Those women pregnant, on their menstrual cycle, or enduring diarrhea, suffered like all the rest. Nothing, it seemed—not age, ailment or ugliness—could repel the Red rapist. Even death was no defense.

“‘I . . . saw some twenty Red Army men standing in line before the corpse of a woman certainly beyond sixty years of age who had been raped to death,’ one sickened witness recorded. ‘They were shouting and laughing and waiting for their satisfaction over her dead body.’”[12]


 Ask yourself again: how would you feel if members of your family were raped in ditches and even by the way sides—“and as a rule not once but several times”?

Or how about “a whole bunch of soldiers” seizing your precious little sister and raping her?[13] Or how about raping your 69-year old grandmother? Or how about finding your lovely young teacher into the woods and, well, used her like a female dog?

“They drove her out on the road stark naked, and many soldiers used her one after the other. She reached her village crawling on hands and knees along the ditch, through mud and snow.”[14]

Furthermore, what if soldiers of the Allied Forces told you that you had no option but to watch your family being beaten and raped? Wouldn’t that be worse than nightmare?

How would you continue to live with that kind of moral degradation and sexual replay in your mind? Do you see why many of those precious women and even their children ended up committing suicide?[15] One rape victim confessed,

“We screamed, we begged them to leave us in peace, but they showed us no mercy. We resolved to end our lives. Everyone had a knife and a piece of rope. Frau P. was first. Young Frau K. hanged her daughter and then herself. Her dear mother did the same with her sister.

“Now only two of us remained. I asked her to fix my rope for I was too upset to do it. Then we embraced one more time and kicked the luggage away on which we had stood.

“I, however, could touch the floor with my toes . . . the rope was too long. I tried over and over—I wanted to die. I looked to the right and to the left, we hung in a row. They were well off, they were dead. As for me, I had no choice but to free myself from the rope.”[16]


Again, raping innocent civilians happened in nearly all the major cities of Germany. Goodrich writes,

“Soon after the fall of Danzig, hundreds of women and girls pleaded with an officer for protection. The Russian pointed to a Catholic cathedral.

“After the females were safely inside, the officer yelled to his men, motioned to the church, and with bells ringing and organ pipes roaring the horror continued all night. Some women inside were raped more than thirty times.

“‘They even violated eight-year-old girls and shot boys who tried to shield their mothers,’ groaned a priest.”

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Author Details
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Jonas E. Alexis has degrees in mathematics and philosophy. He studied education at the graduate level. His main interests include U.S. foreign policy, history of Israel/Palestine conflict, and the history of ideas. He is the author of the new book Zionism vs. the West: How Talmudic Ideology is Undermining Western Culture. He teaches mathematics in South Korea.
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