How We Avoided the Void, and Earth and the Humanity Survived

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(Image: NASA/ESA/ESO/Wolfram Freudling et al. (STECF))

Ten lucky cosmic breaks that brought us here today—at each others’ throats, and sucking our planet’s life blood

From the New Scientist:

Here we are, small beings on a small planet orbiting an unremarkable star in a really rather ordinary galaxy in an otherwise undistinguished part of an unimaginably vast universe.

Yet something about our existence feels, well, special. From the ructions of the early cosmos to the growing pains of our planet and life’s daring evolutionary leaps, not everything about how we got here seems obvious, or even likely.

Perhaps in other corners of the cosmos other sentient beings are also pondering the implausibility of their origins. Perhaps that very implausibility means we are alone with such questions. Either way, follow the trail as we visit 10 turning points in our history – the cosmic accidents that led to us.

Below are two events; check out the rest: The New Scientist.

13.75 billion years ago: How we avoided the void. We wouldn't exist if our cosmic neighbourhood had been just a bit less dense than average during the tumultuous moments after the big bang.

 

13.75 billion years ago: Tipping the antimatter balance. Why isn't the cosmos a sea of bland radiation? The triumph of matter suggests that the laws of physics are biased.

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