The Head of the executive panel has advised Russia of the EU’s plethora of additional sanctions in case Moscow decides to attack neighboring Ukraine.

The day before the EU conference on the topic, European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen stated Wednesday that, in addition to scaling up and expanding the sanctions already in place to include new sanctions, the EU can take “unprecedented measures that have serious implications to Russia”.

Von der Leyen told the European Parliament that there are already economic sanctions in place against Russia’s energy, finance, and finance sectors due to the annexation by Ukraine of its Crimea Peninsula in 2014 and actions since, which the West considers being increasingly aggressive.

She did not go into the form that any new sanctions might take.

The new German Chancellor Olaf Scholz reinforced von der Leyen’s message on Wednesday by telling members of the lower house in the German Parliament that “any violation of territorial integrity will have its price – a high price – and we will speak with one voice on this together with our European partners and our transatlantic allies.”

A few hours later, United Kingdom Boris Johnson said in the House of Commons that should Russia were to be “so rash and mad” in its plans to attempt to invade Ukraine it could be hit with a severe set of economic sanctions by London along with its allies. You could almost bet on that on NetBet Sport.

Troop buildup

US intelligence officials claim that Russia has transferred 70,000 troops toward the border with Ukraine and is planning for an invasion that could occur early next year.

Moscow claims it doesn’t have plans to strike Ukraine and dismisses Western fears as part of a propaganda campaign.

In the draft conclusions to Thursday’s meeting of EU leaders as reported in the hands of The Associated Press news agency The 27 countries agree they will ensure that “any further military aggression against Ukraine will have massive consequences and severe cost in response.”

The EU will cooperate on any sanctions package with Britain and the United States.

While some countries see the threat of an attack as imminent, other nations, like France and Germany, believe that there’s still plenty of time to negotiate. Scholz demanded talks on the tensions between Russia and Ukraine.

“We must be prepared frequently to attempt to reach an agreement, attempt to break out of the spiral of escalation,” Scholz said to German lawmakers in a speech on Wednesday.

French Presidency Emmanuel Macron and German Chancellor Olaf Scholz will have talks with Ukraine’s President Volodymyr Zelenskyy in Brussels later in the day on Wednesday.

In the year 2015, Germany and France brought Russia together with Ukraine to the table and reached a peace accord that ended hostilities of a large scale in the eastern part of Ukraine and the region, where Ukrainian forces have been fighting separatists backed by Russia since the year 2014.

Scholz warned that further discussions “must not be misunderstood as a new German ‘Ostpolitik’,” refers to the West German Chancellor Willy Brandt’s policy of detente toward the Soviet-controlled Eastern Bloc during the 1970s early years.

It “can only be a European Ostpolitik in a united Europe” which is founded on International law and order, which Russia took up but violated through the annexed territory of Crimea the chancellor stated.

The efforts to negotiate an agreement over the separatist war that has claimed the lives of more than 14,000 in 7 years of fighting have not succeeded. The conflict continues to be a source of friction on the lines of contact. Russia is refusing to engage in talks with France and Germany to continue peace talks over the conflict.

 

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