U.S. Department of Defense Contract Awards for Jun 07, 2011

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Here’s Today’s Department of Defense Contract Awards

 

DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY

Vitol, Inc.*, Houston, Texas, was awarded a fixed-price with economic price adjustment contract with a maximum $114,438,946 for aviation turbine fuel.  Other location of performance is Hallen, United Kingdom.  Using service is Defense Logistics Agency Energy.  The date of performance completion is July 30, 2012.  The Defense Logistics Agency Energy, Fort Belvoir, Va., is the contracting activity (SP0600-11-D-0508).

Niche, Inc.*, New Bedford, Mass., was awarded a firm-fixed-price contract with a maximum $51,166,895 for low velocity parachutes.  There are no other locations of performance.  Using service is Army.  The date of performance completion is Feb. 12, 2012.  The Defense Logistics Agency Aviation, Richmond, Va., is the contracting activity (SPM4A7-11-C-0513).

Paranetics Technology, Inc.*, San Luis, Ariz., was awarded a firm-fixed-price contract with a maximum $22,103,700 for low velocity parachutes.  There are no other locations of performance.  Using service is Army.  The date of performance completion is Feb. 12, 2012.  The Defense Logistics Agency Aviation, Richmond, Va., is the contracting activity (SPM4A7-11-C-0515).

GMA Cover Corp.*, Port Huron, Mich., was awarded a firm-fixed-price contract with a maximum $14,743,680 for low velocity parachutes.  There are no other locations of performance.  Using service is Army.  The date of performance completion is Feb. 12, 2012.  The Defense Logistics Agency Aviation, Richmond, Va., is the contracting activity (SPM4A7-11-C-0514).

ARMY

Hensel Phelps Construction Co., Orlando, Fla., was awarded on June 3 a $70,618,651 firm-fixed-price contract.  The award will provide for the construction of the Air Force Technical Applications Center located on Patrick Air Force Base, Fla.  Work will be performed in Patrick Air Force Base, Fla., with an estimated completion date of Nov. 16, 2015.  The bid was solicited through the Internet, with 22 bids received.  The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Mobile, Ala., is the contracting activity (W91278-11-C-0014).





CAPE, Inc., San Antonio, Texas, was awarded on June 3 a $30,000,000 firm-fixed-price indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity multiple-award-task-order contract.  The award will provide for the environmental remediation and consultation services for use within the Southwestern district or nationwide.  Work location will be determined with each task order, with an estimated completion date of June 2, 2014.  The bid was solicited through the Internet, with 25 bids received.  The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Fort Worth, Texas, is the contracting activity (W9126G-11-G-0030).

EA Engineering, Science and Technology, Lewisville, Texas, was awarded on June 3 a $30,000,000 firm-fixed-price indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity multiple-award-task-order contract.  The award will provide for the environmental remediation and consultation services for use within the Southwestern district or nationwide.  Work location will be determined with each task order, with an estimated completion date of June 2, 2014.  The bid was solicited through the Internet, with 25 bids received.  The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Fort Worth, Texas, is the contracting activity (W9126G-11-G-0031).

Earth Resources Technology, Inc., Laurel, Md., was awarded on June 3 a $30,000,000 firm-fixed-price indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity multiple-award-task-order contract.  The award will provide for the environmental remediation and consultation services for use within the Southwestern district or nationwide.  Work location will be determined with each task order, with an estimated completion date of June 2, 2014.  The bid was solicited through the Internet, with 25 bids received.  The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Fort Worth, Texas, is the contracting activity (W9126G-11-G-0032).

McCarthy Building Co., Atlanta, Ga., was awarded on June 3 a $23,050,000 firm-fixed-price contract.  The award will provide for the clinical additions and alterations to Winn Army Hospital, Fort Stewart, Ga.  Work will be performed in Fort Stewart, Ga., with an estimated completion date of Dec. 14, 2012.  The bid was solicited through the Internet, with nine bids received.  The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Savannah, Ga., is the contracting activity (W912HN-11-C-0006).

S.M. Wilson & Co., St. Louis, Mo., was awarded on June 3 a $21,498,000 firm-fixed-price contract.  The award will provide for the design and construction of a 242-person unaccompanied enlisted personnel barracks complex.  Work will be performed in Fort Leonard Wood, Mo., with an estimated completion date of Nov. 11, 2012.  The bid was solicited through the Internet, with three bids received.  The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Kansas City, Mo., is the contracting activity (W912DQ-11-C-4014).

BAE Systems Land & Armaments, LP, York, Penn., was awarded on June 3 an $11,598,005 cost-plus-fixed-fee contract.  The award will provide for the modification of an existing contract to procure Paladin integrated management ballistic hull and turrets.  Work will be performed in York, Penn., with an estimated completion date of April 30, 2012.  One bid was solicited, with one bid received.  The U.S. Army Contracting Command, Warren, Mich., is the contracting activity (W56HZV-09-C-0550).

Dawson Technical, LLC, Boerne, Texas, was awarded on June 3 a $10,000,000 firm-fixed-price indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract.  The award will provide for the engineering services and construction phrase staffing support for the Department of Homeland Security program being managed by the Engineering Construction Support Office in Fort Worth, Texas.  Work location will be determined with each task order, with an estimated completion date of June 3, 2016.  The bid was solicited through the Federal Business Opportunities website, with 19 bids received.  The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Fort Worth, Texas, is the contracting activity (W9126G-11-C-0041).

General Dynamics, Santa Clara, Calif., was awarded on June 3 a $7,313,267 firm-fixed-price contract.  The award will provide for the procurement of two time division multiplexing (TMD) systems; one TDM optional spares package; one contractor furnished on-site support; one factory acceptance test; one year equipment warranty; and one contractor training.  Work will be performed in Amman, Jordan, with an estimated completion date of June 25, 2012.  One bid was solicited, with one bid received.  The U.S. Army Contracting Command, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md., is the contracting activity (W15P7T-11-C-H427).

Raytheon Integrated Defense Systems, Andover, Mass., was awarded on June 3 a $6,813,870 contract.  The award will provide for the procurement of 10,500 antenna elements used in the Patriot missile system.  Work will be performed in Andover, Mass., with an estimated completion date of May 25, 2014.  One bid was solicited, with one bid received.  The U.S. Army Letterkenny Army Depot, Chambersburg, Penn., is the contracting activity (W911N2-11-C-0021).

NAVY

Dck/TtEC, LLC, Honolulu, Hawaii, is being awarded $63,557,654 for firm-fixed-price plus award fee task order FZN0 under a previously awarded global multiple-award construction contract (N62742-09-D-1172) for construction of utilities infrastructure upgrade and communications infrastructure upgrade at Marine Corps Air Station Yuma.  Work includes removal of an existing water storage tank and construction of two concrete potable water storage tanks.  This project will also include the demolition and replacement of existing water distribution lines and will relocate and upgrade the existing sewer collection systems.  Construction will include running new gravity and force lines from new hangars to existing lines, installing a new substation, and relocating the exiting switch station to the new substation.  Installation of a new storm water collection system including retention pond, drop basins, and drop inlets to support maintenance hangar facilities will be required.  Work includes construction of a communication facility and communication infrastructure (data and telephone) upgrade to support fielding of the Joint Strike Fighter F-35 aircraft and its revised flight operations.  This project will be built to Special Access Program Facility standards to provide a secure communication facility that will house new communications and server equipment.  The communication infrastructure will construct a new communication utility backbone.  The task order also contains one planned modification, which if issued would increase the cumulative task order value to $63,577,582.  Work will be performed in Yuma, Ariz., and is expected to be completed by July 2012.  Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year.  Three proposals were received for this task order.  The Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Southwest, San Diego, Calif., is the contracting activity.

United Technologies, Corp., Pratt & Whitney Military Engines, East Hartford, Conn., is being awarded a $52,785,441 modification to a previously awarded cost-plus-award-fee contract (N00019-02-C-3003) in support of the technical base line review on the systems development and demonstration contract for the Joint Strike Fighter Conventional Take-Off and Landing, Short Take-Off and Vertical Landing, and Carrier-Variant propulsion systems.  Work will be performed in East Hartford, Conn. (91 percent), and Bristol, United Kingdom (9 percent), and is expected to be completed in December 2013.  Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year.  The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Md., is the contracting activity.

BAE Systems Tactical Vehicle, LP, Sealy, Texas, is being awarded an $18,641,775 firm-fixed-priced delivery order 0010, modification 001, under contract (M67854-07-D-5030) for the procurement of engineering change proposal Vehicle Emergency Escape window egress kit.  Work will be performed in Butler, Pa., and is expected to be completed by the end of March 2012.  Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year.  Marine Corps Systems Command, Quantico, Va., is the contracting activity.

Overland Corp.*, Ardmore, Okla., is being awarded $8,128,000 for firm-fixed-price task order #0004 under a multiple award construction contract (N40192-10-D-2803) for construction of a Commando Warrior open bay student barracks at Andersen Air Force Base.  The work to be performed provides for construction of a reinforced concrete open bay student basic training dormitory building with laundry, hygiene and shower facilities to accommodate 150 personnel.  The facility will include a reception area, ready rooms, equipment wash down areas, storage space, mechanical spaces, fire suppression/detection, environmental controls, utilities, pavements, parking, and all necessary supporting facilities for a complete and usable facility.  The design and construction will incorporate sustainable design strategies and features.  Work will be performed in Yigo, Guam, and is expected to be completed by June 2012.  Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year.  Six proposals were received for this task order.  The Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Marianas, Guam, is the contracting activity.

BAE Systems Land & Armaments, Ground Systems Division, York, Pa., is being awarded a $7,121,373 indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity delivery order 0015 under previously awarded contract (M67854-07-D-5025) for Mine Resistant Ambush Protected (MRAP) maintenance support.  Work will be performed in Bagram, Afghanistan, and is expected to be completed by December 2011.  Contract funds in the amount of $7,121,373 will expire at the end of the current fiscal year.  Marine Corps Systems Command, Quantico, Va., is the contracting activity.

PKL Services, Inc., Poway, Calif., is being awarded a $7,061,474 modification (P00005) to previously awarded firm-fixed-price, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract (M00681-09-D-0008) to exercise option year two to provide an additional 12 months of aircraft maintenance services and logistical support assistance for the Marine Corps Marine Fighter Attack Training Squadron 101 (VMFAT-101) located at Marine Corps Air Station (MCAS) Miramar, Calif.  Contract funding will be provided with individual task orders for services required.  With this modification exercised, the new contract value is $21,172,112.  Work will be performed at MCAS Miramar, Calif., and is expected to be completed June 30, 2012.  Contract funds in the amount of $2.25 will expire at the end of the current fiscal year.  The Regional Contracting Office, Marine Corps Installations West, Camp Pendleton, Calif., is the contracting activity.

Overland Corp.*, Ardmore, Okla., is being awarded $6,538,000 for firm-fixed-price task order 0003 under a previously awarded multiple award construction contract (N40192-10-D-2803) for construction of a rapid engineer deployable heavy operational repair squadron headquarters/engineering facility at Andersen Air Force Base.  Work will be performed in Yigo, Guam, and is expected to be completed by Oct. 2012.  Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year.  Six proposals were received for this task order.  The Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Marianas, Guam, is the contracting activity.

AIR FORCE

Southern Management, Inc., Goldsboro, N.C., is being awarded a $35,000,000 maximum indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract for repair of airfield/base pavements at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, N.C.  This project includes, but is not limited to, asphalt pavement repair and/or replacement; walk repair and/or replacement; concrete pavement repair and/or replacement; curb and gutter repair and/or replacement; clearing and grubbing; excavation, fill, aggregate base course; milling of bituminous pavement, inlets, catch basins, drainage pipe, pavement markings, seeding, trees and shrubs, soil erosion and control; railroad work; and airfield/street/area lighting.  Bids were solicited electronically and eight were submitted.  The 4th Contracting Squadron, Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, N.C., is the contracting activity (FA4809-11-D-C007).

  • Small business

Those Crazy Insanity Pleas

USA TODAY September 1, 2006 | Vatz, Richard E IN AN OBITUARY OF TRIAL LAWYER Vincent J. Fuller on July 29, 2006, The Washington Post implies that the attorney executed a brilliant defense of John Hinckley, Jr., that won him a “dramatic courtroom verdict.” The Post rhapsodizes that, “Within two hours of the shooting, Mr. Fuller had been asked to take the case. Over the next year, he shaped an insanity defense that has entered legal annals as one of the finest courtroom performances of modern time.” This argument overlooks a critically important facet of that case. The central reason Hinckley was found not guilty by reason of insanity for the attempted assassination of Pr??s. Ronald Reagan was that, in the Federal courts at the time, if the judge permitted the use of the insanity plea, it acquired the presumption of truth. In other words, the government had to prove Hinckley’s sanity beyond a reasonable doubt. This since has been changed, and now the presumption when a defendant pleads not guilty by reason of insanity is that a defendant is sane. insanityvsp90xnow.com insanity vs p90x

With a roughly equal number of psychiatrists testifying on both sides of the insanity issue in the original trial, a jury simply could have reasoned that the presumption had not been overcome by the fact of the numbers itself.

The public outrage pursuant to the Hinckley verdict lasted several years. In addition to the reversal of the presumption of insanity in Federal courts, it led to states approving the plea of “guilty, but mentally ill” in order to ensure eventual jail time for those who were found legally insane. In addition, a general skepticism regarding claims of insanity as exculpating rhetoric permeated the country. This was exacerbated periodically by Hinckley’s attempts to seek unsupervised sojourns outside of Washington, D.C., where he was hospitalized at St. Elizabeth’s Hospital.

Psychiatric and defense interests tried to counter the spreading of resentment against the insanity plea by asserting that it rarely was successful. The consensually approved statistic is that the percentage of cases in the criminal justice system which include successful “not guilty by reason of insanity” pleas is approximately one-quarter of one percent. Even if this were an uncomplicated truth, it masquerades the fact that, over the years, this translates into thousands of cases. However, it is a very complicated fact. There is psychiatric involvement throughout the criminal justice system, from untried cases to plea bargains to psychiatrically affected punishments.

For those who thought we had passed a Rubicon when Hinckley was found not guilty by reason of insanity after he tried to assassinate the President, they may have to think again. Although it appeared that, with the resultant toughening up of insanity pleas throughout much of the nation, that people were less inclined to forgive unusual killings and insanity pleas, Hinckley has been granted unsupervised leaves, with opposition muted perhaps due to the fact that Reagan now is deceased.

Equally significant, a jury has found Andrea Yates, who aggressively killed her five children months after her fifth child was bom, not guilty by reason of insanity. She was found guilty of capital murder four vears earlier and was sentenced to life in prison, but that verdiet was overturned by an appeals court due to erroneous testimony from a prosecution witness.

The public remains mystified by psychiatry, and no amount of empirical evidence can dissuade many from believing that psychiatrists have some insight as to why people do crazy things. The essence of this view is to believe that, if people act in a manner which defies conventional actions, especially if conventional criminal action is flouted, there must be an outside cause, perhaps an illness which forces them to do what they did. The psychiatric community finds the motivation of “insane” killers-although “insanity” is not a psychiatric term-to be mental defects or disorders not entailing the responsibility of the perpetrator. The anti-insanity plea forces consistently have argued that people who kill others choose to do so and have established mens rea, or criminal intent.

According to her attorneys and her psychiatric “expert” testimony, Yates suffered from postpartum psychosis and had delusions of Satan inhabiting her body, believing that killing her children would protect them from going to Hell. Therefore, she was acting without criminal intent, almost as a pawn of her “mental illness.” We may be witnessing “an immeasurable shift in public thinking” regarding the insanity plea,” according to an article which quotes University of Texas law professor George Dix as stating that jurors “could readily conclude [Yates] is one of us, and if she did this, she must be crazy.” The public may see Andrea Yates as superficially resembling themselves, but she had plenty of nonmystifying, run-of-the-mill motivation to kill her offspring. The fact is, some people under tremendous pressure will kill to escape that pressure, however incongruous that may seem to those who do not kill others. go to site insanity vs p90x

The legal standard was whether Yates knew her actions were wrong. The prosecution offered evidence that she did know that killing her children was wrong. There was evidence that she methodically timed the killings, waited until her husband left to murder the kids, and purposely performed the acts before other relatives would come to her home later. In addition, she lined up four of the dead youngsters in a bed beneath a cover while leaving Noah, who fought her attempts to kill him, floating in a bathtub. Moreover, it was Yates who called the police and later said she was “a bad mother.” Both actions indicate she knew what she did was unethical. Her chasing down and murdering seven-year-old Noah shows premeditation, which further should have convinced a jury of her criminal intent and responsibility.

If there has been a change in public opinion regarding the usually bogus insanity plea, it will be an unfortunate communication to harried would-be killers who will learn that capital crime may not be capital crime when it seems inexplicable to a perhaps newly gullible public.

[Sidebar] “… Capital crime may not be capital crime when it seems inexplicable to a perhaps newly gullible public.” [Author Affiliation] Richard E. Vatz, Associate Psychology Editor of US A Today, is professor of rhetoric and communication, Towson (Md.) University.

Vatz, Richard E

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