The Israeli Scientific Mind

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Israelis and  Palestinians differ on autopsy results of Palestinian minister

Palestinian official says medical examination shows Minister Ziad Abu Ein died from being struck and inhaling tear gas; Israeli source: He died from a heart attack.

I am not surprised by this emerging dispute. Israelis are not very good in handling causality unless Jewish pain is detected. In the Jewish universe the Jew is always an innocent victim. But in this case of Minister Ziad Abu Ein, it is a Palestinian person in his prime, who was physically and brutally attacked by a young Israeli policeman. When such an event happens, the Israelis prefer to stick to forensic evidence – they remove any responsibility.

It would be amusing to apply the same approach to ‘anti Semitism.’ Instead of searching for anti Jewish sentiments in every act that may result in Jewish suffering, why don’t we just stick to forensics – the dry meaningless facts. Such an approach may even  reduce the Shoa into an arbitrary list of tragic events. Nothing to dwell upon – Jews would then be liberated from their victim obsession, they may even decide to let their exceptionalism evaporate, once and for all they join humanity for real.

Monitoring the Israeli-Palestinian battle for most of my adult life, I have learned to search for the positive aspect in every tragedy.

Author Details
Gilad Atzmon is an Israeli-born British jazz saxophonist, novelist, political activist and writer. Atzmon’s album Exile was BBC jazz album of the year in 2003. Playing over 100 dates a year,[4] he has been called “surely the hardest-gigging man in British jazz.” His albums, of which he has recorded nine to date, often explore the music of the Middle East and political themes. He has described himself as a “devoted political artist.” He supports the Palestinian right of return and the one-state solution in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. His criticisms of Zionism, Jewish identity, and Judaism, as well as his controversial views on The Holocaust and Jewish history have led to allegations of antisemitism from both Zionists and anti-Zionists. A profile in The Guardian in 2009 which described Atzmon as “one of London’s finest saxophonists” stated: “It is Atzmon’s blunt anti-Zionism rather than his music that has given him an international profile, particularly in the Arab world, where his essays are widely read.” His new book The Wandering Who? is now availble at Amazon.com
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