The Official 9/11 Story … Accept Without Question

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9/11 TRUTH CENSORED

In the United States today, true investigative journalism is rare.

 

By Nathan Janes

 

Major media functions as a gatekeeper of information, creating consensus among Americans on an array of topics including the popularly held beliefs about September 11, 2001.

An atmosphere has been created where questioning the official explanation or asking for a reinvestigation is seen as blasphemy. Individuals who do so are labeled anarchist, conspiracy theorist, domestic terrorist, and anti-government. Politicians and other public figures who have voiced concerns about the 9/11 Commission Report have been invited on national news programs only to be pressured to renounce previous statements about 9/11 and publicly reject any affiliation to the group 9/11 Truth. While a critical analysis of the 9/11 Commission Report is absent from mainstream media, a number of questions go unanswered and unrecognized by most Americans.

 

In the United States today, true investigative journalism is rare. Much of the news circulated by mainstream media is only a presentation of information handed down from the government. Major media functions as a gatekeeper of information, creating consensus among Americans on an array of topics including the popularly held beliefs about September 11, 2001.

An atmosphere has been created where questioning the official explanation or asking for a reinvestigation is seen as blasphemy. Individuals who do so are labeled anarchist, conspiracy theorist, domestic terrorist, and anti-government. Politicians and other public figures who have voiced concerns about the 9/11 Commission Report have been invited on national news programs only to be pressured to renounce previous statements about 9/11 and publicly reject any affiliation to the group 9/11 Truth. While a critical analysis of the 9/11 Commission Report is absent from mainstream media, a number of questions go unanswered and unrecognized by most Americans.





In the days following 9/11, government officials claimed they never imagined anyone attacking the nation by flying planes into buildings even though warnings of such an event had been given from both within and outside of the US.  On August 6, 2001, President Bush was warned by the President’s Daily Brief, headlined, “Bin Ladin Determined To Strike in US.”  In the year before 9/11, Italy, Morocco, and Britain released detailed and urgent warnings to the US of planned attacks using planes as weapons where the World Trade Center was given as a specific target. These warnings were forwarded to certain government officials yet no warnings were issued to the American people. The security of our borders and airports were never increased to protect from such a threat. However, surface to air missiles were placed on the roof of the Sarasota Florida resort in which President Bush was staying the night before the attacks. This was not a typical security procedure at the time.

On September 11, 2001, war games were being held by the military and intelligence agencies, which included scenarios of a domestic air crisis, a plane striking a government building, and a large-scale emergency in New York. When it was recognized that morning by air traffic control that several commercial airliners were not responding and were off course, a response was delayed significantly as it was confused with the large scale war game taking place. Fighter jets could have easily intercepted the hijacked planes under ordinary circumstances but the jets of nearby Air Force bases were otherwise occupied. Between September 2000 and June 2001, fighter jets were sent by the FAA to intercept errant aircraft 67 times; such a task was routine whenever a plane would lose radio contact or fly off course. Isn’t it strange that war games mimicking similar terrorist attacks were taking place at the exact time of the actual events of 9/11 causing confusion and leaving such sensitive locations vulnerable to attack? If this was only an incredible series of coincidences, why did the official investigation avoid reporting on this issue?

The questions that arise from looking closely at the events that preceded the attacks are dwarfed by the volumes of unanswered questions about the attackers, the collapse of the buildings, and the financial gains that resulted from the event.

When presented with these troubling questions, most Americans will respond, “Do you really think the government would lie to us and deliberately kill innocent Americans for an agenda?” 

The American invasion of Iraq, an undeclared act of war, began with the claim that Iraq was a threat due to their possession of weapons of mass destruction. It was found that these weapons did not exist and any ties between the 9/11 terrorists and Saddam Hussein were also found false. As of April 2010, more than 31,000 US troops had been seriously injured and over 4,300 soldiers had died.

Unclassified documents reveal that the United States has planned and engaged in a number of false flag attacks throughout recent history.

On August 4, 1964, the Vietnamese were accused of engaging in two unprovoked attacks on the USS Maddox in the Gulf of Tonkin.  This incident became a pretext for a war that resulted in over 58,000 US soldier deaths. Nearly 140 top-secret documents declassified by the federal government in 2005 revealed that the second Gulf of Tonkin attack, which catalyzed the US into the Vietnam War, never took place. Similarly, in 1898 Spain was accused of destroying the USS Maine. However, evidence is clear that the naval ship was not attacked by Spain but likely exploded due to a coal fire or an external mine. Although the reason for the Maine’s explosion was unknown at the time, newspapers and American industrial magnates were quick to blame Spain knowing that a war would likely result, and their financial interests in Cuba would be protected from the Spanish. The propaganda of this time may be best represented by the slogan ‘Remember the Maine- To Hell with Spain.’

In 1962, the Pentagon created Operation Northwoods, an effort to build public support for a war against Cuba with the goal of ousting Fidel Castro from power. These plans included destroying a naval ship, hijacking planes, and committing acts of terrorism within US cities that would result in the deaths of innocent citizens. These plans were kept secret for nearly 40 years. Comparably, principals in US foreign policy under the Bush administration created plans in the late 1990s, which clearly stated their intent to invade Iraq for the purpose of “regime change.” In their documentation they openly state that the public and Congress would not accept their agenda therefore transition would be slow “absent a catalyzing and catastrophic event like a new Pearl Harbor.”

Rahm Emanuel, White House Chief of Staff under President Obama is quoted as saying, “You never want a serious crisis to go to waste — and what I mean by that is an opportunity to do things that you didn’t think you could do before.” It is clear that the events of 9/11 opened the door for the degradation of Americans’ civil rights, unprecedented intrusions into citizens’ private lives, as well as undeclared and unjustified war.  What is not clear is how an event as catastrophic as 9/11 was permitted to happen. If the mainstream media continues to be our source of information, we will certainly never know the answers to such questions.

The majority of Americans have failed to look beyond the television news, radio, and newspapers of major media outlets for information about 9/11.  Many have adopted the views of these sources without critical analysis or any outside research.

After all, why think for yourself when you can gather your thoughts and opinions from the evening news? In our culture, we have been trained to believe rather than think. The obvious is rejected and the fictitious is accepted. We, the people of this great nation, need to interrupt the transmission of disinformation and demand answers. Do your own research; dig beyond the news presented by the mass media. Although it remains unpopular to ask questions about September 11th, we must summon courage, for, as Thomas Jefferson once said, “All tyranny needs to gain a foothold is for people of good conscience to remain silent.”

Dedicated to the lives lost on September 11th, 2001.

Source:  The original version first appeared here on June 24, 2010.

 

 

 

 

THE SEPHARDIC CONNECTION From Morocco to India

The Boston Globe (Boston, MA) June 14, 1992 | Sheryl Julian, Globe Staff SHERYL JULIAN IS A FOOD WRITER FOR THE GLOBE.

Sephardic cooking is one of the intriguing cuisines of the world, characterized by remarkable combinations born of nostalgia and necessity. It is the food of Spanish Jews and their descendants, who scattered from North Africa to India 500 years ago when King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella demanded that everyone in Spain convert to Catholicism — or leave.

A fleeing population, history has shown us, often clings to its food rituals, and the Sephardim weren’t different in that respect. But settlers, over time, also incorporate new foodstuffs into old patterns, producing a melded cuisine that makes sense only if you know the history of the migrants.

Today, the different cultures that enjoy the abundance of a Sephardic table are bound only by their original connection to Spain. The food is complex, with a startling variety of spices and seasonings culled from the flavors of the Mediterranean, the Middle East, and South Asia.

The Sephardim settled principally in Turkey, where the Ottomans allowed them to live peacefully. From the Turks the settlers learned to appreciate eggplant, dried fruits, and finger foods wrapped in grape leaves. From Morocco they adopted the traditional couscous and the aromatic spices of the Maghreb; from Persia a profusion of walnuts and pomegranates; from Calcutta cardamom and fresh ginger; and from Ethiopia the millet-based pancake injeera.

In Sephardic Cooking, published by Donald I. Fine Inc., Copeland Marks distills the customs of this complicated food and explains the history of each settlement. From the black Jews along the Arabian Sea in India to the Libyan Jews who adopted Arabic flavors, Sephardic cuisine encompasses a rich, exotic table. Maguy Marek’s Turkish lamb with cumin SERVES 6 Maguy Marek brings the best of all worlds into her kitchen: Born in Tunisia, she spent 30 years living in Paris before coming to Boston nine years ago to be near her daughter.

The Sephardim who settled in Tunisia went to a section of Tunis where Jews lived in the 11th century, writes Marks in Sephardic Cooking. Another group was present when the Spanish arrived: Italian Jews, who had been there since the 16th century. There were more influences: The Romans, Arabs, and Turks all ruled at one point, and the French lent the resulting cuisine a sensible refinement. 3 cups boiling water 1 tablespoon tomato paste 1 tablespoon sweet or hot paprika 1 tablespoon ground cumin 1 cinnamon stick or 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 onion, chopped 2 cloves garlic, chopped 3 pounds boneless lamb shoulder, cut into 3-inch pieces Salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste 8 new potatoes, washed, cut into 2-inch pieces, and left in a bowl of cold water In a large, heatproof bowl, mix together the water, tomato paste, paprika, cumin, and cinnamon stick or powder. Stir to mix the ingredients, then set the bowl aside. this web site green bean recipe

In a large, flameproof casserole, heat the oil. Add the onion and turn the heat to medium. Cook for 8 minutes. Add the garlic and cook a few minutes longer.

Add the lamb to the pan, turn the heat to medium high, and cook the meat, stirring it often, until it begins to brown.

Stir in the spice liquid, adding salt and pepper to taste. Bring the mixture to a boil, partially cover the pan, lower the heat, and simmer gently for 40 minutes.

Drain the potatoes and add them to the pan. Continue to cook for 30 minutes or until the potatoes are tender but not falling apart. If the pan seems dry during cooking, add more water. greenbeanrecipenow.com green bean recipe

Adjust the seasoning and serve at once. Valya Shapiro’s fasulya zeytinyagli (Turkish green beans with olive oil) SERVES 4 Valya Shapiro, a Brookline interior decorator born in Turkey, came here 32 years ago to attend graduate school at Brandeis University. Turkish Sephardic cooking is among the most well known of all the Sephardic cuisines, mainly because so many Jews went to Turkey (Ottoman ruler Sultan Beyazit II allowed them to keep their religion). Much of Turkish cooking is based on a cuisine invented when no one had much meat or any ovens to cook it in, so the food is generally long-simmered in sauces. Even the vegetables are cooked like this. This green bean recipe is typical of a Turkish Sephardic side dish, except the classic preparation would produce a dish of very softly cooked beans. To accommodate American tastes, Shapiro shortens the cooking time from the hour-long simmer she learned in Turkey to 30 minutes. 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 teaspoon sugar 2 onions, chopped 1 pound green beans, trimmed 2 tomatoes, chopped 1 cup water Salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste Heat the oil in a skillet, and when it is hot add the sugar. Cook until the sugar caramelizes slightly, then add the onions and cook over high heat until browned. Turn down the heat and cook 5 minutes longer.

Add the beans, tomatoes, water, salt, and pepper to the pan. Cover the pan and cook for 30 minutes or until the beans are tender but still hold their shape.

Transfer the beans to a shallow dish and let them cool to room temperature before serving. Judgja bil zeitoun (Moroccan chicken with olives) SERVES 4 Copeland Marks writes that Moroccan cuisine “is considered the most inventive, flavorful and perhaps ingenious of the cooking styles of the Maghreb.” This dish, in which chicken is simmered with garlic, green olives, turmeric, and tomatoes, is a simple enough combination whose result is surprisingly complex. The recipe is adapted from Marks’ Sephardic Cooking. 1 pound olives in brine (from a Middle Eastern grocery), halved and pitted 1 tablespoon corn oil 4 whole chicken breasts, bone in, skin and fat discarded 4 cloves garlic, chopped 1/4 cup chopped parsley Salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste 1/2 teaspoon ground turmeric 6 plum tomatoes, coarsely chopped 1 cup water In a medium-sized saucepan bring water to a boil. Add the olives and boil steadily for 1 minute. Drain them and set them aside.

In a large saute pan, heat the oil and cook the chicken and garlic over medium heat for 10 minutes, turning the chicken often.

Add the parsley, black pepper, turmeric, and tomatoes. Stir thoroughly, pour in the water, and bring to a boil.

Cover the pan, turn down the heat, and simmer gently for 40 minutes.

Add the olives and cook for 15 minutes longer. Taste for seasoning, add salt if necessary — the olives may be salty enough — and serve at once. Individual eggplant and feta cheese pies MAKES 12 OR ENOUGH TO SERVE 6 Invented from a variety of Sephardic styles — phyllo dough from North Africa, eggplant from Turkey, sheep’s cheese from Greece — these individual pies are formed and twisted shut like beggars’ purses. 1 large eggplant, peeled and cubed Salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste 2 tablespoons olive oil 6 plum tomatoes, chopped 2 cloves garlic, chopped Pinch of crushed red pepper 1/4 teaspoon ground cumin 1/2 cup water 1/2 pound feta cheese 2 tablespoons chopped pitted black olives 6 tablespoons margarine, melted 1 pound phyllo dough, thawed if purchased frozen In a colander, layer the eggplant with salt and let it sit for 20 minutes to drain. Rinse with cold water and set the eggplant aside.

In a large saute pan, heat the oil. When it is hot add the eggplant and cook, tossing it often, for 5 minutes. Add the tomatoes and cook for a few minutes more, still stirring often.

Add the garlic, red pepper, cumin, water, and black pepper and turn the heat to low.

Cook the mixture, stirring occasionally, for 30 minutes or until the eggplant is very soft.

Stir in the cheese and olives. Transfer the mixture to a bowl, let it cool completely, then cover it with plastic wrap and refrigerate overnight.

Set the oven at 375 degrees. Brush a rimmed baking sheet with margarine.

Lay the phyllo dough on the counter and cover with a damp cloth. Pull out two sheets, drizzle them with the melted margarine, and fold them in half, crosswise. Then fold the sheets in half again.

Set a heaping tablespoon of the eggplant filling in the center and pull up the sides of the phyllo dough. With your hands, twist the top shut. Brush the outside with margarine and transfer to the baking sheet.

Continue with the remaining eggplant and phyllo dough until you have 12 beggars’ purses (each package of phyllo dough should contain 24 leaves; most contain 24 even if they say they contain 20).

Bake the phyllo pastries for 25 minutes or until they are golden brown all over. Remove from the oven, let them settle for a few minutes, then serve 2 per person.

Sheryl Julian, Globe Staff

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