Iran’s media wages truth jihad

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“The first casualty of war is truth.” -Aeschylus

 

by Kevin Barrett

 

“The best jihad is a word of truth flung in the face of a tyrant.” -The Prophet Muhammad, peace upon him.

A long line of military strategists, from Aeschylus in the west to Sun Tzu in the east, have concluded that all warfare is inevitably based on deception. More recently, contemporary thinkers such as Gwynne Dyer, whose book on war is one of the best introductions to the topic, have focused on the role of self-deception. Nobody who actually understands what war really is, Dwyer suggests, will ever willingly fight in one.

The central role of the lie in warfare was taken to a new level by the orches-traitors of the 9/11 inside job. But they wouldn’t have succeeded without the self-deception of the masses in general, and the soldiers in particular. Polls showing that the vast majority of US soldiers in Iraq believed they were fighting to take revenge for 9/11 provide evidence of this extreme, psychotic  self-deception. After watching the three skyscrapers in New York being blown to smithereens by powerful explosives, the American people literally took leave of their senses, and have been living in a world of delusion ever since.

If a bunch of psychotics are trying to kill you based on a shared delusion, the best defense may be to disillusion them – in other words, to help them see the truth. Since all forms of tyranny and oppression are ultimately based on lies, “the best (defensive) jihad is a word of truth flung in the face of a tyrant.”

The chief strategic purpose of 9/11 was to trick the US into destroying Israel’s enemies in the Middle East. And Israel’s biggest enemy – because it tells the truth about Zionism – is Iran.  That’s why Iraq and Afghanistan were invaded: to surround Iran. The final act of the 9/11 wars was always supposed to be a US war on Iran for Israel.

The Iranians, who are said to have invented chess, have quite sensibly responded by creating international media channels that report the truth about these matters.

Here is my latest Press TV essay on the Iranian media’s truth jihad:

West fears Iranian media

And here is my latest appearance as a guest on Press TV, airing some unpleasant truths about Saudi Arabia and its relationship to the US and Israel.

Saudi monarchy betraying the Muslim world: Kevin Barrett

 

 

 

 

 

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Kevin Barrett
Dr. Kevin Barrett, a Ph.D. Arabist-Islamologist, is one of America’s best-known critics of the War on Terror. He is Host of TRUTH JIHAD RADIO; a hard driving weekly LIVE call in radio show. He also has appeared many times on Fox, CNN, PBS and other broadcast outlets, and has inspired feature stories and op-eds in the New York Times, the Christian Science Monitor, the Chicago Tribune, and other leading publications. Dr. Barrett has taught at colleges and universities in San Francisco, Paris, and Wisconsin, where he ran for Congress in 2008. He currently works as a nonprofit organizer, author, and talk radio host.

11 COMMENTS

  1. You’re welcome. You are a free person. And you have a free spirit.

    And I am the guy who translated Jim Stone’s Fukushima report into German which snowballed into a gigantic avalanche.

  2. You’re welcome. How about internet ping pong? Here’s my ping (if posting will work, Inshallah):

    Murray’s 900 page ‘History of Chess’ (1913) was based on 14 years of research using original material from the best chess libraries, translated by specialists.

    Murray Established the Baseline for Future Investigation: Murray’s monumental work was supplemented by ‘A History of Board Games other than Chess’ (1952) and, to be more accessible for non-scholars, ‘A Short History of Chess’ (1963). He quoted Daniel Willard Fiske (1831-1904), ‘Before the seventh century of our era, the existence of chess in any land is not demonstrable by a single shred of contemporary or trustworthy documentary evidence… Down to that date, it is all impenetrable darkness.’ After that date, it is all interpretation of the record.

    India – Chaturanga: It is not surprising that the earliest evidence of chess is also the murkiest. Forbes believed that the game called chaturanga, which means ‘quadripartite’ in Sanskrit, referred to a four-player version of the game using dice and was mentioned in the Puranas, which he dated to 3000 B.C. Murray showed that the four-player version came after the two-player version, discarded the notion of dice, and refuted the dating of the Puranas. This left literary evidence pointing to 620 A.D.

    Persia – Chatrang: The period of the Persian Empire relevant to the origin of chess, was known as the Sasanian dynasty or the Sassanid Empire and ruled Iran for over four centuries. One chapter of the ‘Shahnama’ (‘Book of Kings’), describes how the Raja of Hind (India) sent the game via an emissary to King Nushirwan. The same chapter relates the legend of the invention of chess following a civil war between the two sons of a Queen. The game is also mentioned in the ‘Karnamak’ (‘Book of Deeds’).

    Ancient chess history unearthed: *******http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/europe/2155916.stm

    The chess piece was found in the ancient city of Butrint. A team of British archaeologists has unearthed evidence suggesting that Europeans were playing chess as early as the sixth century. An ivory chess piece, excavated at a Byzantine palace in what is now southern Albania, is more than 500 years older than any previously discovered.

    Leaders of the University of East Anglia expedition said it proved the game had a much longer history in Europe than was previously thought. Until now chess historians had agreed that the game only became popular with the European elite during the 12th Century, 700 years after it was invented in China, India or ancient Persia. Walrus ivory

    The chess piece, which is only lightly damaged, was unearthed in the ancient city of Butrint.

    Professor Richard Hodges said: “We are wondering if it is the king or queen because it has a little cross but we are not sure.” The team is now trying to find out exactly which piece it has found. He said historians believed chess became popular in the early 12th Century, because of walrus ivory chessmen found in Scotland’s Outer Hebrides.

    Other pieces were found as far afield as southern Italy. “However, it now looks as though it was already being played in the central Mediterranean over 500 years earlier,” Professor Hodges said. The excavation team, which works with local archaeologists, also discovered coins.

  3. Interesting! With all due respect, I would beg to differ with the Ayatollah on this one. The Qur’an bans gambling and drinking, but since chess as I know it never involves gambling, and is linked to coffee not alcohol, I really don’t see the problem. Maybe chess has different cultural connotations in Iran? (i.e. they drink and gamble while playing?)

  4. Is it permissible to play chess in Iran? A very senior Shia cleric in Iraq considers the game haraam mutlaqan: ********http://www.sistani.org/index.php?p=604382

  5. Another try without quotation marks:

    Murray’s 900 page History of Chess (1913) was based on 14 years of research using original material from the best chess libraries, translated by specialists.

    Murray Established the Baseline for Future Investigation: Murray’s monumental work was supplemented by A History of Board Games other than Chess (1952) and, to be more accessible for non-scholars, A Short History of Chess (1963). He quoted Daniel Willard Fiske (1831-1904), Before the seventh century of our era, the existence of chess in any land is not demonstrable by a single shred of contemporary or trustworthy documentary evidence… Down to that date, it is all impenetrable darkness. After that date, it is all interpretation of the record.

    India – Chaturanga: It is not surprising that the earliest evidence of chess is also the murkiest. Forbes believed that the game called chaturanga, which means quadripartite in Sanskrit, referred to a four-player version of the game using dice and was mentioned in the Puranas, which he dated to 3000 B.C. Murray showed that the four-player version came after the two-player version, discarded the notion of dice, and refuted the dating of the Puranas. This left literary evidence pointing to 620 A.D.

    Persia – Chatrang: The period of the Persian Empire relevant to the origin of chess, was known as the Sasanian dynasty or the Sassanid Empire and ruled Iran for over four centuries. One chapter of the Shahnama (Book of Kings), describes how the Raja of Hind (India) sent the game via an emissary to King Nushirwan. The same chapter relates the legend of the invention of chess following a civil war between the two sons of a Queen. The game is also mentioned in the Karnamak (Book of Deeds).

    Ancient chess history unearthed

    A team of British archaeologists has unearthed evidence suggesting that Europeans were playing chess as early as the sixth century.

    An ivory chess piece, excavated at a Byzantine palace in what is now southern Albania, is more than 500 years older than any previously discovered.

    Leaders of the University of East Anglia expedition said it proved the game had a much longer history in Europe than was previously thought.

    Until now chess historians had agreed that the game only became popular with the European elite during the 12th Century, 700 years after it was invented in China, India or ancient Persia.

    Walrus ivory

    The chess piece, which is only lightly damaged, was unearthed in the ancient city of Butrint. Professor Richard Hodges said: We are wondering if it is the king or queen because it has a little cross but we are not sure.

    The team is now trying to find out exactly which piece it has found.

    He said historians believed chess became popular in the early 12th Century, because of walrus ivory chessmen found in Scotland’s Outer Hebrides.

    Other pieces were found as far afield as southern Italy.

    However, it now looks as though it was already being played in the central Mediterranean over 500 years earlier, Professor Hodges said.

    The excavation team, which works with local archaeologists, also discovered coins.

  6. I wanted to post some historical background about chess but after clicking SUBMIT the comment does not appear here.

  7. About Chess:

    Murray’s 900 page ‘History of Chess’ (1913) was based on 14 years of research using original material from the best chess libraries, translated by specialists.

    Murray Established the Baseline for Future Investigation: Murray’s monumental work was supplemented by ‘A History of Board Games other than Chess’ (1952) and, to be more accessible for non-scholars, ‘A Short History of Chess’ (1963). He quoted Daniel Willard Fiske (1831-1904), ‘Before the seventh century of our era, the existence of chess in any land is not demonstrable by a single shred of contemporary or trustworthy documentary evidence… Down to that date, it is all impenetrable darkness.’ After that date, it is all interpretation of the record.

    India – Chaturanga: It is not surprising that the earliest evidence of chess is also the murkiest. Forbes believed that the game called chaturanga, which means ‘quadripartite’ in Sanskrit, referred to a four-player version of the game using dice and was mentioned in the Puranas, which he dated to 3000 B.C. Murray showed that the four-player version came after the two-player version, discarded the notion of dice, and refuted the dating of the Puranas. This left literary evidence pointing to 620 A.D.

    Persia – Chatrang: The period of the Persian Empire relevant to the origin of chess, was known as the Sasanian dynasty or the Sassanid Empire and ruled Iran for over four centuries. One chapter of the ‘Shahnama’ (‘Book of Kings’), describes how the Raja of Hind (India) sent the game via an emissary to King Nushirwan. The same chapter relates the legend of the invention of chess following a civil war between the two sons of a Queen. The game is also mentioned in the ‘Karnamak’ (‘Book of Deeds’).

    Ancient chess history unearthed

    The chess piece was found in the ancient city of Butrint

    A team of British archaeologists has unearthed evidence suggesting that Europeans were playing chess as early as the sixth century.

    An ivory chess piece, excavated at a Byzantine palace in what is now southern Albania, is more than 500 years older than any previously discovered.

    Leaders of the University of East Anglia expedition said it proved the game had a much longer history in Europe than was previously thought

    Until now chess historians had agreed that the game only became popular with the European elite during the 12th Century, 700 years after it was invented in China, India or ancient Persia.

    Walrus ivory

    The chess piece, which is only lightly damaged, was unearthed in the ancient city of Butrint. Professor Richard Hodges said: “We are wondering if it is the king or queen because it has a little cross but we are not sure.”

    The team is now trying to find out exactly which piece it has found.

    He said historians believed chess became popular in the early 12th Century, because of walrus ivory chessmen found in Scotland’s Outer Hebrides.

    Other pieces were found as far afield as southern Italy.

    “However, it now looks as though it was already being played in the central Mediterranean over 500 years earlier,” Professor Hodges said.

    The excavation team, which works with local archaeologists, also discovered coins.

  8. As Clint Eastwood says in “The Good, the Bad and the Ugly,” there are two kinds of chess stories in the world, short ones and long ones.

    Here is the long one:

    About Chess:

    Murray’s 900 page ‘History of Chess’ (1913) was based on 14 years of research using original material from the best chess libraries, translated by specialists.

    Murray Established the Baseline for Future Investigation: Murray’s monumental work was supplemented by ‘A History of Board Games other than Chess’ (1952) and, to be more accessible for non-scholars, ‘A Short History of Chess’ (1963). He quoted Daniel Willard Fiske (1831-1904), ‘Before the seventh century of our era, the existence of chess in any land is not demonstrable by a single shred of contemporary or trustworthy documentary evidence… Down to that date, it is all impenetrable darkness.’ After that date, it is all interpretation of the record.

    India – Chaturanga: It is not surprising that the earliest evidence of chess is also the murkiest. Forbes believed that the game called chaturanga, which means ‘quadripartite’ in Sanskrit, referred to a four-player version of the game using dice and was mentioned in the Puranas, which he dated to 3000 B.C. Murray showed that the four-player version came after the two-player version, discarded the notion of dice, and refuted the dating of the Puranas. This left literary evidence pointing to 620 A.D.

    Persia – Chatrang: The period of the Persian Empire relevant to the origin of chess, was known as the Sasanian dynasty or the Sassanid Empire and ruled Iran for over four centuries. One chapter of the ‘Shahnama’ (‘Book of Kings’), describes how the Raja of Hind (India) sent the game via an emissary to King Nushirwan. The same chapter relates the legend of the invention of chess following a civil war between the two sons of a Queen. The game is also mentioned in the ‘Karnamak’ (‘Book of Deeds’).

    Ancient chess history unearthed

    The chess piece was found in the ancient city of Butrint

    A team of British archaeologists has unearthed evidence suggesting that Europeans were playing chess as early as the sixth century.

    An ivory chess piece, excavated at a Byzantine palace in what is now southern Albania, is more than 500 years older than any previously discovered.

    Leaders of the University of East Anglia expedition said it proved the game had a much longer history in Europe than was previously thought

    Until now chess historians had agreed that the game only became popular with the European elite during the 12th Century, 700 years after it was invented in China, India or ancient Persia.

    Walrus ivory

    The chess piece, which is only lightly damaged, was unearthed in the ancient city of Butrint. Professor Richard Hodges said: “We are wondering if it is the king or queen because it has a little cross but we are not sure.”

    The team is now trying to find out exactly which piece it has found.

    He said historians believed chess became popular in the early 12th Century, because of walrus ivory chessmen found in Scotland’s Outer Hebrides.

    Other pieces were found as far afield as southern Italy.

    “However, it now looks as though it was already being played in the central Mediterranean over 500 years earlier,” Professor Hodges said.

    Source: Faithfreedom

  9. Intelligence is the ability to recognize TRUTH.
    Character is the ability to speak TRUTH.
    Courage is accepting TRUTH even if it is to ones own demise. And TRUTH is a commodity in short supply.

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